This "magazine" pretends to be a compilation of the best articles in knitting and crochet.
It is a virtual "note book" for the avid knitter and crochetter ... always needing to learn more.
Please read my HOME PAGE

Tuesday, 11 August 2015

The Machine-Sewn Steek

The Machine-Sewn Steek

Knitting Designs by Elinor Brown

Advantages: It’s fast, provides a very sturdy reinforcement, and can be used with any kind of yarn.

Disadvantages: Running the knitted fabric through the sewing machine risks catching floats on the sewing machine plate and distorting the fabric a bit. A line of tiny stitches will also prove difficult (I would say impossible) to rip out if you make a mistake.

Requirements: A sewing machine (duh) and a small stitch setting. This can be done with fibers that do not felt as well as with those that do.

1) Identify one column of stitches as the steek column, the location of the cut (in my example, it is a blue column). You will be sewing straight lines down the center of the stitch columns on either side of the steek column (shown in white below). Take care not to catch any of the floats on the sewing machine plate and try not to pull the fabric through, as this will distort the edge.

2.) Beginning at the top of the work, lower the sewing machine needle into the center of the first stitch to the left of the steek column. Before you sew down the entire column, it is best to backstitch a little bit to ensure the stitching will not unravel. With a small stitch, sew a straight line down this column of stitches, backstitching again at the bottom.

Repeat this process with the column of stitches to the right of the steek column.

Starting at the bottom with small, sharp scissors, carefully cut up the middle of the steek column.

Now that you have a lovely, secured cut edge, you may be wondering what to do next. Chances are, the pattern will call for you to pick up stitches near the cut edge for button/buttonhole or armhole bands. Identify from where exactly (relative to the cut edge) those stitches will be picked up.

Once you pick up and knit these band stitches as directed, the stitches remaining closer to the cut edge will form a facing that can easily be tacked down to the inside of the garment. Here are some examples:

No comments:

Post a Comment